Developing Patience

Developing Patience

Developing Patience

All of the people in your life will benefit if you can be more patient.  The pace of modern society, especially in the United States is becoming frantic, frenzied and a bit out of control.  We learn to justify why we are so busy- the kids, sports, work, social obligations, squeezing in a workout at the gym or even speeding to yoga class.  Then when the kids go to college we sit back and wonder where the time went.  Operating from a busy state of mind, running around town to get all of stuff done is exactly how we miss the present moment of time with our loved ones.  Becoming a multi-tasking genius is not the answer.  We must physically and mentally slow down.  How?  Half measures avail us nothing.  We must work on slowing down, it must become a priority.

I spent 18 years working in various commercial kitchens at a break neck pace for very long hours.  This type of influence goes home with you.  Everything I did was as fast as I could do it.  Even walking from point A to B was like an olympic walking event.  Walking slower in a mindful manner has been the best way to cultivate patience.  It is amazing how much more we see when we slow down and observe what’s around us.  Watch how kids eight and under walk.  They don’t miss anything.  Henry my son had a passion for construction vehicles until he was three years old.  We would be walking and he would scream, “Daddy, look at that front loader !!!” I wouldn’t notice the vehicle right away, but inevitably I would spot one down the road.  Kids like to stop and look at stuff too.  Constantly.  Leaves, bugs, dogs anything at all.  Be curious as you walk daily.  Think of the walks as opportunities for adventure.  The childlike mentality of being curious will help you realize how much you are missing every day.

Here is my idea:  Commit to slowing down and keep at it for a specific amount of time, 3-4 months for example.  Stand tall and walk smoothly with good posture.  Do this until it feels normal.  Notice how you feel at the end of the time period.  You can always go back to the high-speed pace, but not trying to slow down will ensure that nothing changes.  I keep it simple.  I sit down on my yoga mat every day and I walk from point A to B with the mindset and curiosity of a child, spending time watching nature rather than rushing to my destination.  Once you try this, the frantic pace you normally have will finally seem unnatural.

Any other ideas?

ABOUT AUTHOR

Elizabeth Delaney