Remembering Our Connection

Remembering Our Connection

Remembering Our Connection

This time of year can bring about much division… Republican versus Democrat. Pro-choice versus Pro-life. Human rights issues. It can make us all forget that in the end we are all HUMAN. Part of the issue today is that we forget we are all brothers and sisters and that this world is all we have. Instead of arguing with your family or neighbor, may you take the time to look in people’s eyes and regard them as human. Find the connection you share, no matter how small.

As the month turned to November, my daily meditation offered this adaptation of Chief Seattle’s speech. I felt it a great reminder to all of us (regardless of politics, religion and beliefs). I hope we can remember our HUMANITY. May these words inspire you to be kind and remember we belong to each other and we humans are only a small part of the earth’s great history. What will our legacy be?

… This we know, the earth does not belong to man. Many belong to the earth, all things connected like the blood that unites us all, man did not weave the web of life he is only a strand in it, whatever he does to the web, he does to himself. Your destiny is a mystery to us, what will happen when the buffalo are all slaughtered, what will happen when the secret corners of the forest are heavy with the scent of many men, when the views of ripe hills are blotted with talking wires? The end of living and the beginning of survival, when the last red man has vanished with his wilderness and his memory is only a cloud moving across the prairie, will these shores and forests still be here? Will there be any spirit of my people left?

We love this earth as a newborn loves his mother’s heartbeat. So if we sell you our land, love it as we have loved it, care for it as we have cared for it, hold in your mind the memory of the land as it is when you receive it. Preserve the land for all children and love it as God loves us all. One thing we know, there’s only one God, no man be he red man or white man can be apart. We are brothers after all.

ABOUT AUTHOR

Elizabeth Delaney